Walter S. Arnold, Sculptor/Stone Carver: Classically trained in Italy. Custom hand-carved stone sculpture. Made in the USA and Italy.

Walter S. Arnold Sculptor/Stonecarver: Classically trained in Italy. Custom hand-carved stone sculpture. Made in the USA and Italy.Classically trained in Italy. Custom, hand-carved, stone sculpture. Made in the USA and Italy.    Call for an estimate:  (847) 568-1188  or  Fely@stonecarver.com
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The Gargoyle News #33, Feb. 14, 2002

Happy Valentines Day! I've transformed my latest gargoyle into a special
Valentine's card, just for you. This large stone carving is the first of a
set of four true gargoyles for a house in Texas. A true gargoyle
is a waterspout; however, in the past hundred years the word
"gargoyle" has come to apply to a wide range of grotesque
sculptures. These four gargoyles will be installed in the
brick balconies of the house, and the rain water will drain
through their mouths. You can view your card at
http://stonecarver.com/card/valentine-lion.html
This is an animated card, so you need to have Java enabled to
see it. If you don't have Java, you can view the card without
the color animation at http://stonecarver.com/card/ice-lion.html

These four gargoyles will represent the four seasons, and are
based on four different animals. This first one is a winter lion.
It is 2' wide and 18" tall and weighs more than 350 pounds.
(60 x 45 centimeters, over 160 kg.)

I am still finishing the mane and icicles on the lion's right
side, but it is almost complete.

Remember to send gargoyle Valentines cards to your friends
and loved ones. I have a Valentine's version of the Dolce Mio
(My Sweet) card, at http://stonecarver.com/postcard.html
I've also added both the Java animation and regular versions
of the Winter Lion card to that page.

**********************************************************

I just finished repairing my studio. You'll recall that a few
weeks ago someone crashed a large sport utility vehicle into the
front of the building, destroying a brick wall and shattering
three windows. Fortunately, my gargoyles protected the sculpture
and other things (including me!) which were inside the studio
at the time. I replaced the brick wall with a much stronger
solid stone wall, and built a gargoyle into the wall to guard
over the studio and protect me from other drivers. You can see
it at http://stonecarver.com/gargoyles/wall.jpg
This guardian is the piece I carved at the StonExpo trade fair
in Florida this winter.

**********************************************************

More on the Naritasan Shinshoji Temple: I've added a photo of one
of the statues of Fudo-myoo, the god of fire, to my Naritasan page
at http://stonecarver.com/gargoyles/naritasan.html
This is not the original statue carved in the year 810 A.D.,
because no one is permitted to photograph that one. This deity
sits in the main sanctury of the Great Pagoda of Peace at
Naritasan, built in 1984. It is one of the many sculptures of
Fudo-myoo in Japan.

Mr. Saito, the chief of the English volunteers at the temple,
sent me this photo together with more information on Fudo-myoo.

Fudo ranks first among the five great myo-o(Buddhist
deities of esoteric Buddhism). He has five attributes represented
in the sculpture:

  1. His fiery demeanor reveals that he is the conqueror of human
    anger. Anger is the most unyielding inner enemy of man,
    thus its defeat requires the divine intervention of a spiritual
    power, such as Fudo.
  2. He sits on a rock. That means he is immovable, and
    has firm belief and conviction in human salvation.
  3. Flames shoot up from his back, because he dwells in
    a conflagration that burns up all the worldly passions
    of sin.
  4. He carries a sword in his right hand. This weapon gives him
    the power to conquer the devils who threaten to degenerate man
    through the provocation of carnal desires.
  5. He holds a rope in his left hand, symbolizing that he holds
    the souls of all people with the deepest mercy.
If you ever travel through Japan and have a few hours to spare,
you will really enjoy a visit to the Naritasan Shinshoji Temple.
It is just 25 minutes from the Narita international airport, so
it is an ideal way to pass a long lay-over between flights.

 


You can read more issues online:
  

Issue 7        Mythology of gargoyles, the Zoroastrian Farohar
Issue 10      Why sculpt gargoyles? Notre Dame and Toronto gargoyles
Issue 32     
Narita, Japan
Issue 33      Naritasan Shinshoji Temple, Valentines gargoyles
Issue 51     
Stonecarvers Guild, New York Gargoyles, Frank Lloyd Wright Fountain
Issue 68     
Dublin, My new studio, Jackson Park Bridge, student questions, wedding registry
Issue 81      Aurora Dream Cycles Show, Almora B&B, Emperor Trajan, Facebook
  Special pages created to accompany newsletter issues:
Atlanta Botanical Garden
Antique Italian Cars
Architectural vandalism
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Calvary Cemetery
Carving the Indiana Museum gargoyles
Des Moines, Iowa
Dublin, Ireland
Gargoyle Tattoos
Jackson Park Animal Bridge
Las Vegas
My New Studio
Orvieto, Italy
Prague, Czech Republic
San Diego, Balboa Park
Staglieno Cemetery, Genoa, Italy
Tuscany
Volterra Italy
Zimbabwe Sculpture in Atlanta

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